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Fiat 500 Hybrid -

Score

Performance

Handling

Comfort

Space

Styling

Build

Value

Equipment

Economy

Depreciation

Insurance

The 500 has been a great success story for Fiat, offering buyers a cute, retro citycar at affordable prices. But does it still have what it takes against newer rivals? Jonathan Crouch takes a look at a revised range enhanced with mild hybrid tech.

Ten Second Review

Fiat's cheeky little 500 is a stylish citycar that remains as appealing as ever. It's recently gained clever 1.0-litre mild hybrid petrol power and Fiat has just added in yet another package of mild cosmetic tweaks. Otherwise this car hasn't been fundamentally changed in recent times - and loyal buyers didn't really want it to be. These people will like the smart look, the various media options and the very individual feel. You can tell that Fiat knows its market.

Background

If ever a car has built its brand, it's this one, Fiat's 500. In fact, it's done so twice. First at its original launch back in 1957. And more recently with this modern era version, first launched in 2008. Ever since, it's been a money-spinner for the Italian brand, who've never stopped trying to improve it. We got quite a wide-ranging package of updates in early 2014 that gave buyers of more expensive versions the company's 'UConnect' infotainment technology. Then in early 2020, the brand announced a 1.0-litre mild hybrid three cylinder engine and decided that this combustion-fuelled model would, for the time being anyway, continue to sell alongside the all-new electric EV version. Fiat's also put considerable thought into a wide range of personalisation options. It all means that on paper at least, this car remains a strong proposition. The small, fashionable citycar segment though, has changed substantially since this model's original launch. Does this Fiat still have what it takes to compete? Let's find out.

Driving Experience

The big news here is the introduction of a mild hybrid 70hp 1.0-litre three cylinder petrol engine to replace the aging 69hp 1.2-litre conventional four cylinder unit this car's been soldiering on with since launch. The mild hybrid powerplant improves fuel efficiency without impeding performance. It also ensures a very high standard of driving comfort thanks to a 12-volt 'BSG' 'Belt-integrated Starter Generator', allowing for a quiet, vibration-free restart of the internal combustion engine in Stop&Start mode. The engine (which in conventional form we've already seen in the 500X SUV) puts out 92Nm of pulling power and works via a 6-speed manual gearbox integrated with that 'BSG' set-up we just mentioned. The 'BSG' system is mounted directly on the engine and is operated by the belt that also drives the auxiliaries. The new system also involves lowering the entire power unit 45mm so the car behaves better on the road thanks to the lower centre of gravity. As before, there's a 1.4-litre petrol turbo unit for the Abarth models. In recent times, Fiat has tried to improve both the ride and handling of this 500, though this will probably be of limited interest to the car's urban-minded audience. You'll find that the engine can get a bit vocal if you work it hard. Even then though, the gruff, slightly throbby note is characterful rather than unpleasant and around town, refinement is more than acceptable. If you are urban-bound, you might also want to consider the optional (but rather jerky) Dualogic gearbox, a kind of manual transmission without a clutch. Unless you like all that left-foot pumping of course. With the Dualogic though, you'll have to have the older less efficient 1.2-litre 69hp engine. City dwellers will appreciate the tight 9.3m turning circle.

Design and Build

Fiat would've been unwise to mess with the 500's shape too much, so sensibly, they've kept exterior styling tweaks to the minimum with this 500 model over the last few years. As before, there's a single three-door bodystyle, though you can order it in soft-topped '500C' form if you like the idea of having an electric fabric-folding roof. Your Fiat dealer will also offer you a fashionable choice of wheels, graphic packages and paint colours. Inside, with this updated model, Fiat has taken the opportunity to slightly re-design the seats and add a matt silver dashboard finish. Otherwise, it's very much as you were. The biggest change to more recent versions of this car has been the inclusion of 'Uconnect' infotainment systems on all models. Smart air vents flank the screen, leading to a much more integrated feel than you'd get in many more expensive cars. Drivers will also appreciate the smart steering wheel with its chrome-plated switches. Plus, if they're in one of the top-spec model,s they've the benefit of an optional 7" TFT instrument cluster. In the rear, larger adults will find their heads brushing the roof and will need to make full use of the elbow cut-outs indented into the side panels. Most though, will find the space provided just about sufficient for two people on short to medium journeys - and it'll probably be fine for kids. The 185-litre boot remains as before, no bad thing as this still trumps many rivals. If you need to carry more, then you can push forward the rear bench, which split-folds in all but the entry-trim level. This frees up 550-litres. Bear in mind if you opt for the 500C convertible version that the luggage capacity figures fall slightly to 182-litres.

Market and Model

As before, there's a choice of fixed-top and convertible 500 models. The open-topped 500C variants require a premium of around £2,500 over their standard counterparts. If you're happy with tin-top 500 motoring, then you'll find pricing that's a fraction higher than before, yet which still starts at around £13,300 for the baseline 1.0-litre 'Pop' version. Above this variant, there are 'Connect', 'Dolcevita' and 'Sport' trim levels priced up to around £16,500. While there are cheaper and more practical cars out there, these prices are on par with other style led hatchbacks and they undercut what you'd pay for a comparable MINI Hatch 3-door. Key options include the Dualogic semi-auto gearbox which requires a premium of around £750. So what do you get for your money? Base 'Pop' trim has LED daytime running lights and a Uconnect infotainment system with six speakers, plus AUX-in/USB ports and steering wheel remote controls. Mid-range 'Connect' spec meanwhile, gets you a 7-inch Uconnect infotainment system with DAB radio, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The 500 'Dolcevita' trim level builds on the 'Connect' specification while harking back to the Nuova 500 when it was launched in 1957 with its glamorous style and fine aesthetic details. The interiors include a body-colour dashboard, while outside there are chrome-plated details, a glass sunroof and 15-inch alloy wheels. All 500 models are safe too, with a five star Euro NCAP safety rating, seven airbags, ABS with electronic brake distribution, electronic stability control, a Hill Holder clutch to make pulling away on an incline easier and hydraulic brake assistance to help with emergency stops.

Cost of Ownership

One of the advantages of such a small car is that tiny fuel efficient engines are more than adequate for hauling you and your little Fiat around. Particularly the mild hybrid 1.0-litre 'Firefly' unit now fitted to all versions of this car. The electrified system used here recovers energy during braking and deceleration, stores it in a lithium battery with a capacity of 11Ah, and uses it, at a maximum power of 3,600W, to restart the engine in Stop&Start mode and to assist it during acceleration. This technology allows the internal combustion engine to switch off by shifting into neutral, even at speeds below 18mph. The dashboard, which displays information on the hybrid system, prompts the driver when to shift. The mild hybrid propulsion unit works with a 6-gear manual transmission aimed at improving fuel economy in out-of-town driving, thanks to new low-friction bearings and gaskets and the use of a specific high-efficiency lubricant. Expect a WLTP combined cycle fuel reading of 53.3mpg in regular use and an WLTP-rated CO2 emissions figure of between 114 and 120g/km, depending on the 500 version you choose. If you decide to go for the open-topped 500C variant with this engine, you'll see no penalty for either economy or emissions. What else? Well, this car should certainly be cheap to insure. The warranty is a typical three year affair but with a 100,000 mile limit that's significantly higher than some other brands will give you. 500 models hold their value very well and that's unlikely to change any time soon. Don't be tempted to go customisation-crazy with the options list though: not everyone will share your taste or want to pay extra for graphics when it comes time to sell.

Summary

To be honest, Fiat hasn't needed to do a whole lot to retain this 500 model's popularity. It still looks great, it's always been fun to drive and providing the pricing doesn't get too ambitious, the market remains there for it. As for this updated version, well the mild hybrid technology is welcome. And there are plenty of personalisation options for Fiat dealers to talk about in the showroom. Otherwise, things are much as before, which means that the sound and eager response you get from the various engines very much suit the car and though the quoted running cost returns are difficult to achieve in real-world motoring, there's no doubt that this will be a very cheap thing to run indeed, thanks to the mild hybrid tech. Yes, this model remains pretty small inside, but then smallness is all part of the appeal. You'll appreciate that when zipping around town in one. In summary then, this car remains as likeable as ever. Choosing a 'fashionable' little runabout can often be a risk. Here though, is one you can enjoy without a worry.

Fiat 500 (2015 - 2020) - By Jonathan Crouch

Score

Performance

Handling

Comfort

Space

Styling

Build

Value

Equipment

Economy

Depreciation

Insurance

By Jonathan Crouch

Introduction

Fiat's cheeky little 500 is a stylish city car that remained as appealing as ever in this rejuvenated post-2015 guise. The car wasn't fundamentally changed as part of this mid-term facelift - but then loyal buyers didn't really want it to be. These people will like the smarter look, the extra media options and the more individual feel that came with this update. You can tell that Fiat knows its market. If you're looking for a used 500, it's worth stretching to this rejuvenated post-2015-era version.

Models

3dr citycar (0.9, 1.2 & 1.4 T-Jet petrol / 1.3 MultiJet diesel [Pop, Lounge, S, Mirror, Abarth])

History

If ever a car has built its brand, it's this one, Fiat's 500. In fact, it's done so several times. First at its original launch back in 1957. And more recently with this modern era version, first launched in 2007 and significantly improved in mid-2015 to create the refreshed version we're going to look at here. You could argue that the reason why this car was created at all lies with the existence of its closest rival, BMW's MINI. When that car was re-launched for the modern era at the turn of the century, Fiat realised it could do the same thing by reinventing its classic 1950s Nuova Cinquecento model. So the Italian brand set to work, creating a new car that drew upon the fashionable cues of the old one and launching it just in time to take on the second generation MINI model. Shortly after the 500's original launch, we got the option of an open-topped 500C body style and frantic Abarth-branded hot hatch versions. Then in 2010, a clever 85bhp two cylinder TwinAir petrol engine was added to the range for extra pep and a little more economy, with a pokier 105bhp version of this unit added to the range in 2014. There was a 1.3-litre diesel engine too. But more work was needed. By 2015, this Fiat was facing tougher competition, not only from the MK3 version of the MINI Hatch but also from other style-orientated small cars like the Vauxhall ADAM, the Citroen-derived DS3 and new generation versions of smart's fortwo and forfour models. Hence the thorough update that created the revised facelifted version of this car we're going to look at here. The look didn't change much as part of this facelift - it didn't need to. Looks were the main reason why prior to 2015, over 1.5 million people had bought themselves this car. Minor tweaks though, brought the styling into line with other larger models in the wider 500 range, plus there was a little more efficiency, more scope for personalisation and wider availability of the Fiat Group's Uconnect infotainment technology. The 500 sold in this form until 2020 when mild hybrid engineering was introduced. It's the 2015-2020-era model though, that we look at here as a used buy.

What You Get

We'd understand if you concluded that this facelifted post-2015-era Fiat 500 looks pretty much the same as the earlier version. Nevertheless, Fiat insisted that no fewer than 1,800 changes were made in improving it. None of these altered the dinky external dimensions, so at just 3.5m long, 1.6m wide and 1.5m high, this Fiat can easily fit into spaces that even a MINI would have to avoid. If you choose the 500C variant rather than the fixed-top model, you get what amounts to a full-length canvas sunroof which electrically retracts into a concertinaed bundle just above the boot. Most of the exterior styling tweaks that were made here can be found at the front. As part of the update, the main round headlights adopted clever polyellptical modules for improved night time vision and integrated dipped-beam headlamps and turn signals. The lower lights just below deal with the main beam and LED daytime running light functions and adopted the same circular profile so as to graphically reproduce the zeros of the '500' name. Inside, delicious details are everywhere, the coloured fascia panels featuring iconic '500' badging and colour-matched against the bodywork. The key change to this improved model was reserved for plusher variants, a 5-inch 'Uconnect LIVE' infotainment display screen mounted high on the dashboard, right in your line of sight. This system, which was optional on lower-spec models, allows Bluetooth hands-free calling, music streaming, voice recognition and an SMS reader that will read text messages to you. As for the rear seat, well, given that the external dimensions of this car are so short, you won't be expecting to find much room there - and there isn't. Larger adults will find their heads brushing the roof and will need to make full use of the elbow cut-outs indented into the side panels. Most though, will find the space provided just about sufficient for two people on short to medium journeys - and it'll probably be fine for kids. Out back, the boot has a high lip and a narrow opening and remains one of the more compact offerings in the segment. Once you get your stuff in though, the 185-litre space it provides is no smaller than an ordinary mainstream citycar like Toyota's Aygo would give you.

What You Pay

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What to Look For

The 500 has earned a decent reliability record, helped in no small part by its reliable engines. Many will have been used as driving school cars, so check for slipping clutches. We've come across other issues with trim rattles (the driver's door handle has been known to easily break) and problems with the heating and ventilation system. Thoroughly check the Uconnect media set-up too, if your car has it. Check for upholstery damage caused by child seats in the back, typical supermarket dints and scrapes, DPF filters on the diesel cars and ensure all the electrical functions - which can get surprisingly sophisticated on up-spec models - work as advertised as these can be expensive to fix. The 500 isn't bad on consumables like brake pads and most people should be able to park it without nerfing the extremities. The Dualogic auto gearbox can be temperamental.

Replacement Parts

[based on 500 1.2-litre petrol - 2016] Using the base 1.2-litre petrol model as an example, expect to pay around £5-£13 for an oil filter, around £7-£10 for an air filter and around £9-£11 for a wiper blade. Front brake pads vary in price between £15-£50 for a set; for rear pads, think around £17 for a set. Front brake discs cost in the £27-£56 bracket; rear discs cost in the £21-£92 bracket. A radiator costs in the £97-£132 bracket. A headlamp costs in the £84-£125 bracket; a tail lamp in the £63-£82 bracket. An electric mirror is around £70. A water pump is in the £27-£46 bracket; a thermostat is around £24; a starter motor is around £55.

On the Road

And on the move? Well the Italian brand enhanced refinement and improved the braking performance of this revised model but in truth, the dynamic feel of this car won't be a very important consideration for most potential buyers. They'll be more interested in the super-tight 9.3m turning circle and the way you can twirl this car into the tightest parking space thanks to the super-light 'City' steering feature. These people will often be urban-based - hence the relatively high take-up for the clutchless 'Dualogic' transmission option. And over 80% of them tend to opt for the powerplant you'll most commonly find, the 69bhp 1.2-litre petrol unit. There are other engine options - a 1.3-litre MultiJet diesel and the 1.4-litre T-Jet turbo petrol unit used in the hot hatch 'Abarth' models for example - but if you really don't want the rather feeble petrol 1.2, then the powerplant you should look to is the clever 0.9-litre two cylinder TwinAir petrol unit, which was offered in either 85bhp or 105bhp guises. This delivers a lovely putter-putter thrum that seems to be exactly the kind of thing you'd have heard from the 1957 original nipping through the back streets of Naples. More importantly, in a TwinAir 500 model you'll be getting around 50% more pulling power than you would be in a 1.2-litre variant, yet this is mated to the potential for quite outstanding frugality. An 85bhp TwinAir 500 is supposed to be capable of achieving up to 74.3mpg on the combined cycle and 90g/km of CO2 (both NEDC figures). It's urban-friendly through and through you see.

Overall

To be honest, Fiat didn't need to do a whole lot as part of the 2015 year facelift to retain this 500 model's popularity. This car continued to look great and as always, it was fun to drive. Issues like restrictions in bootspace and rear seat accommodation remained here, but the things the brand could improve without a major redesign were usefully updated creating a more modern-feeling product. As importantly, it became a more personalisable one as part of this update, thanks to the 'Second Skin' individualisation programme. And no other citycar from this period is more media-savvy thanks to the clever Uconnect infotainment systems that transformed the interior. In summary then, this Fiat 500 remained as likeable as ever in this improved form. Choosing a 'fashionable' little runabout can often be a risk. Here though, is one you can enjoy without a worry.

Fiat 500 Hybrid - With June Neary

Score

Performance

Handling

Comfort

Space

Styling

Build

Value

Equipment

Economy

Depreciation

Insurance

With June Neary

Introduction

Fiat's 500 is the citycar of the moment. June Neary looks at the revised version

Will It Suit Me?

I'm pleased to say that I don't remember the original Fiat 500. It was half a century ago that car was launched after all. So I can't tell you whether the latest Fiat 500, now recently updated, is a true retro tribute to the original. Sorry. But of course, like me, you don't care. All that matters is that it's cute, it's nippy and it's the latest thing to be seen in. A MINI? That's so yesterday...

Practicalities

I was a bit disappointed to learn that for all its Italian heritage, this car is in fact built in Poland. Oh well, better news comes in the realisation that it has a reputation as an entertaining steer. At 1.65m wide, 1.49m high and 3.55m long, the 500 doesn't take up a great deal of space. For reference, a MINI is much wider, a little lower and a fair bit longer. Even little runabouts like Hyundai's i10 or Volkswagen's up! won't fit into some parking spaces the 500 will be able to squeeze into. My local Lidl supermarket has a ridiculously tight underground carpark, so I can testify to the benefits of this. I tried the revised mild hybrid version but to me, it looks no different. As before, delicious design details drip from this design. It's like a tiny pearl, especially when the ivory finish interior fitted to my test car is specified. There's a very well-judged blend of retro chic and ruthlessly modern contemporary design inside, with circular head restraints, a glass roof and iconic 500 badging on the Panda-sourced dashboard. Chrome-ringed vents and a fascia that can be specified in the same colour as the body are just some of the interior design features. The exterior treatment is cool and clean too. The neighbours had a good old stare.

Behind the Wheel

Fiat knows how to make great little engines for great little cars. But I did wonder what the petrol mild hybrid version might be like. Fiat claims that it's one of the world's cleanest and greenest four-seater petrol-powered production cars. My expectations weren't high. Something driven by battery packs perhaps? Or perhaps so feebly powered that it would struggle to show a bike courier a clean pair of tailpipes. I was wrong. The latest 1.0-litre engine has decent pulling power and works via a 6-speed manual gearbox integrated with a 12-volt 'BSG' 'Belt-integrated Starter Generator', allowing for a quiet, vibration-free restart of the internal combustion engine in Stop&Start mode. The new system also involves lowering the entire power unit 45mm so the car behaves better on the road thanks to the lower centre of gravity. In preference to a 500, you could save a few thousand and buy the more practical Fiat Panda with the same mild hybrid tech. But then, you only live once and how often are you going to need five doors in a citycar anyway? If it helps you to justify things, Fiat claims that body rigidity is around 10 per cent better than the Panda's, so in theory, the 500 should be slightly more crash-proof.

Value For Money

As before, there's a choice of fixed-top and convertible 500 models. The open-topped 500C variants require a premium of around £2,500 over their standard counterparts. If you're happy with tin-top 500 motoring, then you'll find pricing that's a fraction higher than before, yet which still starts just shy of £12,600 for the baseline Pop version. Is that good value? Well, trendier town tots nearly all cost more. You'll need to find at least £2,000 more on top of Fiat 500 prices to buy an equivalent MINI. Fiat's Panda is one of the cheapest cars to own, so the '500' will prove little different. Expect well over 50mpg (53.3mpg [WLTP]) in regular use and an NEDC-rated CO2 emissions figure of 88g/km (down from 114g/km before). If you decide to go for the open-topped 500C variant with this engine, you'll see no penalty for either economy or emissions. Depreciation won't be anything like at MINI levels but will be much better than you'd expect on a Panda. Which is good news since insurance costs shouldn't be much more expensive.

Could I Live With One?

I much prefer this approach to retro design to the kind of thing BMW have delivered us with the MINI. It seems more real somehow - and infinitely more exciting. The fact that it's more affordable too is just the icing on the cake. Right now, this remains one of the most fashionable things you can be seen in up and down the high street. How long it will remain that way is, of course, quite another question...

Interior Features

  • Chrome entry kick plates (£100.00)
  • Smoking kit (£55.00)
  • Techno leather steering wheel with audio controls
  • Techno leather steering wheel with audio and Dualogic controls (£125.00)

Driver Information

  • 7" TFT instrument cluster (£275.00)
  • 7" HD Touchscreen Radio with 3D Navigation, Bluetooth, USB, and DAB (£325.00)
  • 7" HD Touchscreen Radio, Bluetooth, USB and DAB

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

  • Air conditioning
  • Auto climate control (£300.00)

Body Glass

  • Dark tinted rear windows (£175.00)

Driver Convenience

  • Dusk and rain sensors (£150.00)

Trim - Cloth

  • Cloth - Black with black ambience (£0.00)

Exterior Body Features

  • Metallic paint (£550.00)
  • Electric sunroof (£750.00)
  • Special paint (£350.00)
  • Fixed glass sunroof with sunblind (£400.00)
  • Pastel paint
  • Matt paint (£750.00)

Paint - Metallic

  • Metallic - Crossover black (£550.00)
  • Metallic - Electroclash Grey (£550.00)
  • Metallic - Groove metal grey (£550.00)
  • Metallic - Electronica Blue (£550.00)
  • Metallic - Avantgarde bordeaux (£550.00)

Paint - Special

  • Matt - Marching green (£750.00)
  • Pastel - Bossanova white (£350.00)
  • Pastel - Tech house grey (£0.00)
  • Pastel - Pasodoble red (£350.00)

Wheels - Alloy

  • 15" alloy wheels 6Y8 (£150.00)
  • 15" Satin graphite alloy wheels 0R3

Wheels - Spare

  • Space saver spare wheel (£100.00)
  • Fix and go puncture repair kit

General

  • Coin Series: Sport
  • Coin Description: N
  • Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
  • Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 999999
  • Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
  • Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 8
  • Safety Concerns?: False
  • Special Edition: False
  • Special Order: False
  • Based On ID: N
  • Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 8D
  • Service Interval Mileage: 18000
  • Service Interval Frequency - Months: N
  • Timing Belt Interval Mileage: N
  • Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: N
  • NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 66
  • NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 49
  • NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 53
  • NCAP Safety Assist %: 27
  • NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 3
  • Badge Power: 69
  • Badge Engine CC: 1.2
  • Vehicle Homologation Class: M1
  • Generation Mark: 2
  • Alternative Fuel Qualifying: False

Engine and Drive Train

  • Cylinders - Bore (mm): 70.8
  • Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 78.9
  • CC: 1242
  • Cylinders: 4
  • Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
  • Number of Valves: 8
  • Camshaft: SOHC
  • Fuel Delivery: MULTI POINT FUEL INJECTION
  • Catalytic Convertor: True
  • Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
  • Compression Ratio: 11.1:1
  • Transmission: SEMI-AUTO
  • Gears: 5 SPEED

Performance

  • 0 to 62 mph (secs): 12.9
  • Top Speed: 101
  • Engine Power - BHP: 69
  • Engine Power - PS: True
  • 0 to 60 mph (secs): False
  • Engine Power - KW: 51
  • Engine Power - RPM: 5500
  • Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 75
  • Engine Torque - NM: 102
  • Engine Torque - RPM: 3000
  • Engine Torque - MKG: 10.4

Weight and Capacities

  • Minimum Kerbweight: 995
  • Gross Vehicle Weight: 1350
  • Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 35
  • Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 800
  • Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 400
  • Max. Loading Weight: 355
  • Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 185
  • No. of Seats: 4
  • Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 474
  • Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 9.3

Emissions - ICE

  • CO2 (g/km): 116
  • Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6
  • HC+NOx: N
  • Particles: N
  • WLTP - CO2 (g/km) - Comb: 136
  • WLTP - CO2 (g/km) - Comb - Max: 136
  • WLTP - CO2 (g/km) - Comb - Min: 136

Fuel Consumption - ICE

  • EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: False
  • WLTP - MPG - Comb: 47.1
  • WLTP - MPG - Comb - Min: 47.1
  • WLTP - MPG - Comb - Max: 46.3
  • WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb: 6
  • WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb - Min: 6
  • WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb - Max: 6.1

Tyres

  • Tyre Size Front: 185/55 R15
  • Tyre Size Rear: 185/55 R15
  • Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
  • Wheel Type: 15" ALLOY
  • Wheel Style: N
  • Alloys?: True
  • Space Saver?: False

Vehicle Dimensions

  • Length: 3571
  • Width: 1627
  • Wheelbase: 2300
  • Width (including mirrors): 1893
  • Height: 1488
  • Height (including roof rails): N

Fuel Economy

Fuel Tank Size: 35 Litres

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